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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
on a mission to bring a free world class education to anyone, anywhere. >> it's really about the student taking ownership of their own learning. >> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 questi
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
phones and tablets including everything from instructive or educational materials to games. children of all ages, armed with these devices, are using apps and raising concerns over privacy. federal trade commission is now investigating whether companies that make apps are violating the privacy rights of children by collecting personal data from mobile devices and sharing it with advertisers and data banks. these types of apps can detail a child's physical location or phone numbers of their friends along with other information. yesterday the f.t.c. issued a new report documenting those concerns. it found among 400apps designed for kids most failed to inform parents about the types of data that could be gathered and who would access it. the co-editor of the collaborative web blog boing boing and a father who uses and closely watches apps for kids. we talked via laptop. >> your phone as a unique i.d., and so that i.d. could be passed to third party ad networks that are advertising on other apps so they can follow you from app to app and build a file on the kinds of things that you're do
reform. >> rose: right. >> i think really looking at regulatory structures, educational structures, things like that. >> rose: but that costs money. >> i needs to be revisited. the look, i think we've got to get kind of the $4 trillion thing behind us and then -- but it's not like the government shouldn't invest in anything one of the things that has come out of every jobs council i've been a part of that is almost universal until the b.r.t. is that that thisntoury needs to invest in infrastructure. this is something that the president and the b.r.t., jobs councils, all agree but it runs into problems because what's -- the funding structure going to be? how do we pay for it and things like that? >> rose: that's the potential for growth and growth is the essential thing. build the infrastructure, build the education. >> anybody doesn't that doesn't think once we do this four trillion dollar down payment that growth isn't the most important thing is crazy. so that's what we have to be looking at for broader tax reform. >> rose: and simpson-bowles is a good guideline? >> i think simps
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - hi, neighbour! we're playing at katerina kittycat's house today. - hello, daniel tiger, meow, meow. hi, neighbour. - hi, katerina kittycat. - hee! hee!
to talk about how they get health care, how they educate their kids, he has to talk about a lot of things that republicans traditionally don't like to talk about when it comes to certain groups of people. that is the test for marco rubio and paul ryan. >> what about chris christie and bobby jindal? >> christie is in temporary quarantine because of his behavior in the last week of the election. he is in talk. -- detox. >> detox on the jon stewart show. >> you have bobby jindal, kelly ayotte, ted cruz -- unless you are barack obama, you don't imagine yourself as president before you even serve in this and it. [laughter] he will have to wait. obama, of course, is the one exception. but this is a strong young outfield. mitch daniels and in jeb bush on the outside. what this tells you is what could have been in 2012. you remember the line of it republican candidates earlier this year, it was not exactly a credit to the party. and 20 debate heard them. -- hurt them. >> the quarantined governor christie and the new jersey has a 72% favorable job rating among his constituents, the highest ever re
and could recite things. >> the ghish have a very rigid form of education. a poem of week. >> yes, i forgotten most of them but certainly as actors if you do a lot of theatre there is a certain muscle in your brain. >> rose: yes. i am fascinated by that. it is a muscle so you know how to inhabit lines. >> well you know how to recall them because they leave a deep memory trace it is extraordinary i haven't done theatre for a while and the memory trace on tv and others in television is so much faster because you move faster through the process and it is not a repeated pattern every day. >> rose: but we thought of you as a man of the theatre. >> well, may be, i don't think you can shake that off and that's where i grew up and cut my teeth and, you know, will return to, but that muscle has gone flabby, i tell you. >> rose: this is another where anna visits her husband, mr. bates, in jail. >> so what have you got? >> what use could i have in here? >> to be honest i am not sure about my cell mate. >> ah. just remember what my mother used to say. never make an enemy. now, do you think you c
journeys and their "not so straight lines." here's author and educator, lou heckler. >> how many of you are now doing what you thought you'd be doing when you first went to work? i'll guess maybe about 25%. i was reminded of this recently when i spoke to a group of dentists about leadership. we talked about how they got into dentistry because they liked working with their hands, they liked helping people. and now? now, they also negotiate building leases, and manage staffs, and cope with shrinking reimbursements and the soft economy. my first job as a manager involved leading 17 people in a television news department. one of my old college friends surprised me by asking: how does it feel to be out of the news business? i only later realized he meant that all of us who have the privilege of leading others soon realize that leading is our job. that once-straight line we visualized where our skills were needed has zigs and zags in it. the skills we now need to learn and hone and practice have changed. its a wonderful honor to be at the top of an organization, but the old concept of straigh
alarming findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education
, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about our culture, you know the horrors, the importance of -- the importance of the land, of the place, of
four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort of term temperment in terms of where his mind is set at this moment. >> there was a little bit of chitchat before we started the interview and i had the opportunity to congratulate him for the first time since his election. and i said you've been a little busy. he said yes no trip to disneyworld for me. so he seemed a little tired. he seemed a little frustrated at the pace of how these negotiations are going. but he also came across as the cool, calm, no drama obama that we've come to know from him as a candi
. you have to educate all these new people coming in. in addition to the economy, there are incentives to get it done now. >> woodruff: we'll let you go back to watching it. lori montgomery of the "washington post," thank you. >> thank you. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, the right-to-work battle in michigan; tax breaks on the chopping block; homeland security secretary janet napolitano; toxic chemicals in sandy's storm surge; and factory workers at risk around the world. but first, with the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: egyptian president mohammed morsi called out the military today, ahead of next weekend's referendum on a new constitution. opposition forces say the document will enshrine the power of islamists and curb human rights. security forces were deployed today near the presidential palace where protesters remain camped out. they said it's not enough that morsi rescinded decrees that granted him near-absolute power. e new constitutional declaration canceled the first one but statement it contained the same statement as the previous on
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)